Marshfield
Rod & Gun Club

Archery

 

Archery
Matches are held throughout the year on the outdoor range which consists of 28 targets over 15 acres with target distances from 15 feet to 80 yards. Practice is held on the 20 yard indoor range and 10 to 50 yard outdoor area.

“Learn to Shoot” Friday nights with Certified Instructors from 5-6:30 p.m. from September till June.  Check event calendar for specific dates.

All equipment is provided for beginners. Families are encouraged to join. There is instruction available for all ages!

Please visit our Archery Forum

Learn To Shoot Contacts:

Brian MacFee  bmacfee@systemsupport.com 

Dave Greenwood  dvdgrnwd@hotmail.com



  

3 Photographs by Melissa Blackall

Field archery involves shooting at targets of varying (and sometimes unmarked) distance, often in rough terrain.

Three common types of rounds (in the NFAA) are the field, hunter, and animal. A round consists of 28 targets in two units of 14 (until the early 60's two rounds of 28 were shot for 56 targets). Field rounds are at 'even' distances up to 80 yards (some of the shortest are measured in feet instead), using targets with a black bullseye (5 points), a white center (4) ring, and black outer (3) ring. Hunter rounds use 'uneven' distances up to 70 yards (64 m), and although scoring is identical to a field round, the target has an all-black face with a white bullseye. Children and youth positions for these two rounds are closer, no more than 30 and 50 yards (46 m), respectively. Animal rounds use life-size 2D animal targets with 'uneven' distances reminiscent of the hunter round. The rules and scoring are also significantly different. The archer begins at the first station of the target and shoots his first arrow. If it hits, he does not have to shoot again. If it misses, he advances to station two and shoots a second arrow, then to station three for a third if needed. Scoring areas are vital (20, 16, or 12) and nonvital (18, 14, or 10) with points awarded depending on which arrow scored first. Again, children and youth shoot from reduced range.

One goal of field archery is to improve the technique required for bowhunting in a more realistic outdoor setting, but without introducing the complication and guesswork of unknown distances. As with golf, fatigue can be an issue as the athlete walks the distance between targets across sometimes rough terrain.

3D Archery is a subset of field archery focusing on shooting at life-size models of game and is popular with hunters. It is most common to see unmarked distances in 3D archery, as the goal is to accurately recreate a hunting environment for competition.

Though the goal is hunting practice, hunting broadheads are not used, as they would tear up the foam targets too much. Normal target or field tips, of the same weight as the intended broadhead, are used instead.

In the past 10 years 3D archery has taken new light with a competitive edge. There is a whole new group of competitions that are no longer considered hunting practice. Competitions are held in many states (United States) with the totals from each state being added together to crown a single winner within each division. Some competitors will travel thousands of miles a year to compete to try and claim the world title in 3D archery. This competitive style has been growing in many other countries and should continue with strong support for many years to come. (sourced from Wikipedia)

3D Archery Contacts:

George Thibeault 781-706-1114     Scott Moorhouse 781-799-3152

Tri-County 3-D Archery League

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